with Storyteller Lynn Rymarz Saturday, June 24 Join storyteller and Author Lynn Rymarz as she steps back in time to tell the story of Mary … [Continue Reading]

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with Storyteller Lynn Rymarz Saturday, June 24 Join storyteller and Author Lynn Rymarz as she … [Read More...]

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Instead of a #TBT, this week we are featuring a Centennial #FlashbackFriday. The 1920s housing boom in Mount Prospect saw scores of non-Germans and non-Lutherans. It became time for more churches to be constructed so everyone could worship in the manner of their choosing. Dr. Howard Sinclair had begun a mission church in the Central School in 1928. Before long, others felt that it was time for a full-fledged, English-speaking Protestant church. Many residents attended St. Paul Lutheran Church. Since many of the services were in German, an English-speaking church was seen as a community priority. In November 1935, resident Leonard Johnson and his wife opened their home at 405 S. Wille St. to 13 residents to discuss forming an English-speaking church. The first formal church service was February 7, 1937 at the Northwest Hills Country Club, now the Mt. Prospect Park District’s Golf Club. Rev. Louis P. Jensen preached at the first service. Land for a permanent church was donated by Bert E. Terpning. Located south of the tracks, on the southeast edge of town, the name of South Church seemed right. In 1937, Edwin I. Stevens became the first pastor of The South Church of Mount Prospect, IL. The Christian Education Building was added on to the church in 1958 and the picturesque church, was, for many years, in high demand for weddings, even by non-members, and a popular place to worship. Dwindling attendance, however, forced the congregation to put the church on the market in late 2016. In April it was officially sold to Dasom Community Church. The South Church congregation now leases back the space to hold a service once a week. #mountprospect #mountprospectcentennial #mountprospect100 ... See MoreSee Less

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